Hardcopy Release, Kindle Countdown Deals, and an Amazon Gift Card

I’m a little late writing this, but better late than never right?!

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This is our Vintage Jane Austen blog week. What does that mean? Well, the title of the post kind of says it all, but to clarify:

  1. The Vintage Jane Austen collection is now available in paperback. This is my first print edition in about 10 years, so I’m pretty excited.
  2. The Kindle editions of the Vintage Jane Austen novels are on sale all this week. So, if you are a committed Kindle user, this is your week!
  3. A lot of bloggers out there have joined in with the celebrating and through their sites we will be giving out a $25 Amazon gift card. See below for a list of the bloggers you can visit this week for reviews, interviews, and chances to enter.

November 5
Review of Emmeline – Once Upon the Ordinary
Review of Bellevere House – Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes
Series Spotlight – A Real Writer’s Life
Interview with Kelsey Bryant – Resting Life
Series Spotlight – Kelsey’s Notebook

November 6
Interview with Sarah Holman – J. Grace Pennington
Review of Emmeline – Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes
Mini-Reviews and interview with Sarah Scheele – Deborah O’Carroll
Interview with Rebekah Jones – Livy Lynn Blog
Review Suit and Suitability – Resting Life

November 7
Interview with Kelsey Bryant – J. Grace Pennington
Review of Perception – Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes
Review and Interview of Perception – Purely by Faith Reviews
Review of Second Impressions – The Page Dreamer
Series Spotlight – Finding the True Fairytale

November 8
Interview and Review Suit and Suitability – Once Upon the Ordinary
Review of Suit and Suitability – Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes
Review of Perception – A Brighter Destiny

November 9
Series Spotlight – God’s Peculiar Treasure
Review of Second Impressions and Suit and Suitability – Ordinary Girl, Extraordinary Father
Interview with Rebekah Jones – Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes
Series Spotlight – Christian Bookshelf Reviews

November 10
Review of Suit and Suitability – With a Joyful Noise
Series Spotlight – Liv K. Fisher
Review of Second Impressions- Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes
Review of Perception – She Hearts Fiction
Interview with Sarah Holman – Rebekah Ashleigh

November 11
Series Spotlight – Reveries Reviews
Review of Suit and Suitability – Faith Blum
Interview with Sarah Holman – Kaylee’s Kind Of Writes
Interview with Hannah Scheele – Peculiar on Purpose
Review of Bellevere House – Seasons of Humility

New here and not sure what the Vintage Jane Austen Series is?

What would it be like to see Elizabeth Bennet in 1930’s clothes? What if Emma Woodhouse was the daughter of a car dealership owner? What if Marianne Dashwood was seeking to become a movie star in the golden age of film? The Vintage Jane Austen series explores the world of Jane Austen, set in 1930’s America. Five authors took on Jane Austen’s five most popular novels and retold them set in the depression era, remaining faithful to the original plots. As an extra bonus to the series, there is a collection of short stories that were inspired by Jane Austen. Which of these books do you most want to read?

Emmeline by Sarah Holman (Emma): The talk of stock market crashes and depression isn’t going to keep Emmeline Wellington down. Born to wealth and privilege, Emmeline wants nothing more than to help her new friend, Catarina, find a husband. Emmeline sets her sights on one of the town’s most eligible bachelors, but nothing seems to go right. Even her friend and neighbor Fredrick Knight seems to question her at every turn.

Suit and Suitability by Kelsey Bryant (Sense and Sensibility): Canton, Ohio, 1935. Ellen and Marion Dashiell’s world crumbles when their father is sent to prison. Forced to relocate to a small town, what is left of their family faces a new reality where survival overshadows dreams. Sensible Ellen, struggling to hold the family together, is parted from the man she’s just learning to love, while headstrong Marion fears she will never be the actress she aspires to be. When a dashing hero enters the scene, things only grow more complicated. But could a third man hold the key to the restoration and happiness of the Dashiell family?

Bellevere House by Sarah Scheele (Mansfield Park): It’s March, 1937 and Faye Powell couldn’t be happier. After moving to live with her uncle, a wealthy banker, she’s fallen into the swing of life with his exuberant children–including Ed. The one she’ll never admit she’s in love with. But she hadn’t reckoned on the swanky Carters getting mixed up in that vow. Ed seems to be falling for charming, sweet Helene Carter. And when Faye’s cousin BeBe trusts her with a secret about Horace Carter, Faye is in over her head. Will she betray the confidence BeBe’s given her? Will she lose Ed to Helene? The days at Bellevere House are crowded with surprises and only time will tell how God plans to unravel Faye and Ed’s hearts.

Perception by Emily Benedict (Persuasion): Upstate New York, 1930. Thirteen years ago, Abbey Evans was persuaded to break off her engagement to a penniless soldier headed to the front lines of the Great War. A daughter of one of America’s wealthiest families could never be allowed to marry so far beneath herself. But Black Tuesday changed everything. With her family’s prominence now little more than a facade, Abbey faces the loss of her childhood home. As if that weren’t enough, the only man she ever loved has returned after making his fortune – and he wants nothing to do with the young woman he courted before the war. With the past forever out of reach, the time has come for Abbey decide her own fate, before it is too late…

Presumption and Partiality by Rebekah Jones (Pride and Prejudice): Coming soon…A retelling of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice… set in 1930s Arizona.

Second Impressions: Jane Austen’s stories have inspired writers for generations…in this collection they inspire fiction across the genres! From the English Regency to the American 1950s, in Houston or a space freighter, fairytale land or a retirement center…Austen’s timeless characters come to life again.

Thanks for stopping by!

Author Rebekah Jones – The Vintage Jane Austen Project

Author Rebekah Jones has been a bit of a hero to the Vintage Jane Austen project. Rebekah-Author-Picture-2017-200x300Another author originally signed up to pen a new spin on Pride and Prejudice, but bowed out several months later. We couldn’t have a Jane Austen series without Pride and Prejudice! Thankfully, Rebekah, who already has five books to her name, graciously stepped in and took on the project, even though she was several months behind. We are all very excited about the forthcoming Presumption and Partiality and I’m so glad she could join us here today!

How did you get involved in the Vintage Jane Austen Project?

Sarah Holman wrote me, asking if I would be interested in rewriting Pride and Prejudice in the 1930’s for the Vintage Jane Austen Collection. I wasn’t sure at first – in a lot of ways, it would be a new challenge in writing for me – but the idea struck me as being a fascinating experience and a lot of fun, so I said that I would.

How big of a Jane Austen fan are you?

Moderate? I own all of her books and I’ve seen multiple versions of most of the novels put to film. (Even Lawrence Olivier and Greer Garson doing their Victorian Era version of Pride and Prejudice and Bollywood making the same story an Indian style musical!) I don’t obsess over Jane Austen in any way, although I’m determined to have a Regency wardrobe one of these days. I admire her literary skill, enjoy her characters (Fanny Price has always been my favorite), and enjoy pulling Biblical principles from her stories.

RebekahIs there a reason you choose Pride and Prejudice to translate into the 1930s?

Actually, I didn’t choose it. Pride and Prejudice was the only novel left in the collection that wasn’t already being written. When Sarah asked me to join the group, she specifically asked if I would write Pride and Prejudice. Honestly, it was the most perfect one for me to write! Despite Mansfield Park being my favorite, I know Pride and Prejudice backwards, forwards, and topsy-turvy, since it’s the one I’ve seen and read the most.

How well do you think Pride and Prejudice translates to the Great Depression?

Oh, it depends. Some parts translate so perfectly, that it’s fascinating. Others have to be changed and I need to get creative. The underlying characters and the motivation for their actions are, for the most part, so timeless that sometimes all I have to do is come up with a different outplay of those motives. Perhaps the biggest difference is that Jane Austen’s Regency England was affluent and even the poor shown are fairly well off, whereas my Great Depression Arizona is already suffering the ravages of poverty and suffering. 

What kind of research did you do to prepare yourself?

Lots and lots of books. I read up on Arizona in the entire decade of the 1930’s for weeks. Then, when I decided on writing in the years 1932-1933, I started looking for materials that were more specific to those years. I did some on the ground research exploring, since I chose to use real towns, instead of fictional ones. Then, I read some more, looked up as many pictures as I could find of Gilbert, Phoenix, and Scottsdale in the 1930’s, and read even more. I also read a few fiction books, trying to get a feel for dialogue, as well as pulling out some old movies. Possibly one of the more fun resources I found were the records of the Weather Bureau for the area that I was focusing on, in my exact years. Those proved fascinating and very helpful.

Did you stick pretty closely to the source material, or did you find ways to deviate and/or add new scenes?

I think, at its core, Presumption and Partiality has remained close to the source material, but I certainly found scenes to add, as well as a surprise twist or two. The poverty of the Great Depression has influenced some of those changes, since as I said earlier, it made a huge impact on my research. Further, as my general writing motto is “Bible Centered, Modern Literature” I wanted to be able to show the Biblical motivations or answers to some of the circumstances and people in the book, which has made this an interesting journey.

What did you find most challenging about this project?

Honestly? Writing the actual words has been the most challenging part of this project. Especially, writing while trying not to compare myself to Jane Austen. Writing this book has been a major challenge. A good one, but still a major challenge.

What other books do you have on the market?

I have five other books on the market. My novels: Grandmother’s Letters a treasure hunt mystery, Journeys of Four a tale of mystery and redemption, and 24 Days Before Christmas a Christmas murder mystery with each chapter being written as a day in December leading up to Christmas Day. I also have two children’s books, A Year with the Potters a collection of short stories about a homeschooling family and A Tale of the Say’s Phoebe a story of a mother bird telling her young how she learned to fly.

Thanks again, Rebekah, for joining this project and joining us today!
Please check out Rebekah’s books and blog at rebekahsquill.com.

Author Kelsey Bryant – The Vintage Jane Austen Project

Today we have author Kelsey Bryant who took on Sense and Sensibility for the Vintage kelsey1Jane Austen Series and gave us the delightful Suite and Suitability. It’s been great getting to know Kelsey, who is probably Eleanor Dashwood’s biggest fan. In addition to the Vintage Jane Austen Project, she has written for several magazines, blogs, and has two contemporary novels on the market.

How did you get involved in the Vintage Jane Austen Project?

One day, Hannah Scheele and Sarah Holman were talking and somehow formed the scheme for the Vintage Jane Austen Project. Knowing me well, they asked if I wanted to write one of the books. I have hardly ever felt more excited to say yes!

How big of a Jane Austen fan are you?

A very big one, but not the sort who eats, sleeps, and breathes her. I haven’t made a fan website, nor can I quote from her novels very accurately. She is one of my two favorite authors, however, so although I know she’s not a perfect writer, I still feel a little defensive every time she’s criticized. I think I’ve read everything she’s written that’s been published. I own a fair collection of Austen memorabilia and I traveled on an England tour three years ago that was themed around Regency costumes. I sewed my own dress (a first) for it and participated in the Jane Austen Festival Promenade in Bath, England, and it was one of the best days of my life . . . so, yes, I suppose I am a pretty thick Janeite, aren’t I?

KelseyIs there a reason you chose Sense and Sensibility to translate into the 1930s?

Sense and Sensibility is my favorite Austen novel, and one of my favorite novels in general. I adored the idea of writing my own version of it because I’m extremely fond of all the characters and their dynamics, especially Elinor and Marianne Dashwood and Edward Ferrars. Elinor is my favorite fictional character in all of literature.

How well do you think Sense and Sensibility translates to the Great Depression?

Very well indeed. I had no problems with it. Elinor became Ellen Dashiell, a precise, hard-working secretary; Marianne became Marion Dashiell, an aspiring singer/actress; all the other characters translated fluently as well. The Dashwoods’ money troubles fit into the Great Depression, as did the issues of class and suitable marriage partners. I was surprised and delighted with how seamlessly it could be adapted.

What kind of research did you do to prepare yourself?

Because I wanted a Midwestern industrial town, I settled on Canton, Ohio, and researched its status in the 1930s. My favorite book on the subject is The Secret Gift by Ted Gup, a fascinating, nostalgic true story that anyone might enjoy reading, not just those who are researching the time period. I visited Canton to do onsite research and look for answers to questions I couldn’t find from afar. I also read books about the decade in general. Then I pursued the other special areas of interest that my story possessed – Broadway, Hollywood, New York, industry, et cetera – as I began to write. Watching period movies and reading fiction of the era was certainly a fun way to get a feel for it.

Did you stick pretty closely to the source material, or did you find ways to deviate and/or add new scenes?

I deviated while keeping true to the spirit and skeleton of the original. My brain needed the stimulation of creating slight differences in the story, not just remaking the original with new hair and clothes. I left out some characters and introduced new ones that better served my version. I changed the family relationships of some of the characters: for example, Sir John Middleton and his mother-in-law, Mrs. Jennings, became the married couple Melvin and Jennie Maddox, who were relatives of Mr. Dashiell’s in my version, not Mrs. Dashwood’s, as in the original. I also added a few twists to further change it up and make it more fun for me to write and more unexpected for readers. The biggest, perhaps, was keeping Mr. Dashiell alive but in prison instead of killing him off like Mr. Dashwood.

What did you find most challenging about this project?

Well, besides the normal frustrations of tying up all the threads and actually weaving Suit and Suitability into a cohesive, satisfying novel, I would say Marion’s character was the most challenging. Which is quite appropriate, as she is the most challenging person that her family knows, too. I wanted her to be liked by at least some readers, but I also didn’t want to diminish her personality. Writing her was a tricky balancing act. Also, some of her interests, such as the way Broadway worked in the 1930s, were rather difficult to ferret out details for accurate portrayal. But she and I made it through okay, and I love her as much as I love Ellen, even if I still don’t relate to her as well.

What other books do you have on the market? Currently, two novels targeted for homeschool girls – Family Reunion and England Adventure, books one and two of the Six Cousins series.

Thanks, Kelsey, for joining us today! Check out Kelsey’s website kelseybryanauthor.weebly.com to learn more about her writing! And for more information on the complete Vintage Jane Austen Series, visit vintagejaneausten.com.

Author Sarah Holman – The Vintage Jane Austen Project

I’m happy today to be interviewing Sarah Holman today, author of the first book in the Vintagesarahholman2-202x300 Jane Austen Series, Emmeline (Emma), as well several other novels and short stories. Sarah also runs the blog Homeschooled Authors which helps to promote independent authors with a homeschool background. One of the originator of the project, she is passionate about writing, literature, and, of course, Emma.

How did you get involved in the Vintage Jane Austen Project?

I was talking with a friend about a fairytale short story collection. We liked the concept, but wanted something other than fairytales. She mentioned Jane Austen and that was all I needed. Kelsey Bryant, Hannah Scheele, and myself met up one day and brainstormed the idea. It was an awesome beginning to this very cool project.

How big of a Jane Austen fan are you?

I love Jane Austen, but I’m far from the biggest fan. I have only read three of her books (though I love the long movies) and there are a couple of her stories I don’t care for. However, She has a talent for crafting characters in all her books that blows me away at times.

Is there a reason you choose Emma to translate into the 1930s?

Firstly, this is my favorite Jane Austen novel. It has so many awesome elements in it, my favorite being Mr. Knightly and Emma’s relationship. They are best of friend that both encourage and scold each other. It is so lifelike and enjoyable.

How well do you think Emma translates to the Great Depression?

I honestly felt like my job was easy. In the original story has some people who are struggling financially. The characters and struggles ended up flowing easily into the time period.  About the hardest thing was finding replacements for the balls, as dances were not the same.

What kind of research did you do to prepare yourself?

I read quite a few books on and written during the 1930’s. My favorite resource were books by Grace Livingston Hill. She wrote during this time and captured the emotions, culture, and feel of the time that you can’t find in a textbook. She also gave me great insights into the Christians of the time as well.

Did you stick pretty closely to the source material, or did you find ways to deviate and/or add new scenes?

I added my own touches and twists to be sure, but I tried to stick close to the original story. After all, I wouldn’t want to mess up Jane Austen.

What did you find most challenging about this project?

It was my first time coordinating with others in my writing. Everyone involved has been amazing, but I have learned a lot and some aspects were challenging.

What other books do you have on the market?

Emmeline is one of ten books I have on the market. I have an book sent during the revolutionary war, two in an FBI series, four in a Medieval series, and a sci-fi trilogy. I also have several short stories.

A big thanks to Sarah for joining me today and for coming up with this project in the first place! If you would like to learn more about Sarah’s work, visit her website: www.thedestinyofone.com or check out the rest of the books in the Vintage Jane Austen series at vintagejaneausten.com.

Next week I will have author Kelsey Bryant with me to talk about transforming Sense and Sensibility.

My Indie Story + Giveaway

Bio PicYes, I am ending the month of Indie Author April by actually interviewing myself. Strange, I know. But I’ve been asked before to write about my publishing experience, so I figured this might be a good opportunity to go about it. And, yes, this does end with a chance to win one of my books. :)

First tell us a little about your books.

My first mystery novel, Only Angels Are Bulletproof, was published in 2008. Since then I’ve published two novels in The Father Christmas Series, and have one novella, The Moment Max Forgot Me, available as a free download.


Angles CoverWhat formats of Indie Publishing have you used?

I used a self-publishing house for Only Angels Are Bulletproof. Both Christmas novels were published through Kindle’s ePublishing program. I used Smashwords for The Moment Max Forgot Me. They will host free books.

Do you have one you prefer above another?

While I enjoy the fact that a self-publishing house allowed me to have physical copies of my book, did editing and cover design for me and set up a few interviews, over all I’ve had a much better end result from Kindle’s program. Straight to the point, I lost money on a self-publishing house, but I’ve actually been able to make a little on Kindle. Their system is pretty comprehensive, including providing yearend tax statements.

Is there a reason you chose the independent route?

I think my initial decision to independently publish had a lot to do with both fear and impatience. Just the slightest bit of research on the publishing industry will scare you into certainty that your book will never see the light of an editor’s office. I was in my early twenties at the time, just coming off the recovery of a serious illness and not the least bit ready to face rejection like what I was reading about. I mean, really, are we ever ready?
However, in the end I’m glad I chose this route to start with. It allowed me to build some confidence, know trials and frustrations and failures in its own way, connect with readers and have amazing experiences like book signings and school events. Did I tell you I got fan art? (look here)

Do you do your own editing, cover design, and promoting as well?FCC JPEG 1

Nowadays I do it all. I actually love cover design. I did both Father Christmas Novels and The Moment Max Forgot Me. Photoshop and I have fond feelings for each other. Editing and I are trying to get along. I’m kind of an intense, get it all on the paper at once, writer. So, without the help of some very patient family member-proofreaders, I would be incoherent. I am looking into a professional proofreader, but I’ll just have to see what is in the budget for this year.

Any technical issues?

Kindle does not format itself!!! If you have never published through Kindle I will stress above all else that you have to learn how to format. If you just write a manuscript in MS Word and hit upload you are going to end up with tons of weird gaps and breaks in the middle of your sentences. Do your research on this one. Kindle doesn’t get along with most word-processing programs and its “Preview” feature lies!

What did you not expect when you came into the Indie world?

I didn’t expect to have to become so technical. When I started writing I was typing up simple manuscripts on a shared family computer. These days I work off of dual screens, know how to write some basic code, design and support my own website, Photoshop covers together and feature my work on multiple social media platforms. I’m no IT wiz, but I have to know my way around.

Are you considering traditional publishing any time in the future?

Yes. I would still like to traditionally publish a book and am currently working my way towards that goal. My life never works out the way I think it should and sometimes it just plain works out irrationally, so we’ll just have to see how things go.

FCP JPEG 1Any last words of advice for fellow Indie Authors?

Tons! Pay attention to your proofreading and formatting. A good cover is unfathomably valuable. Always be good to your readers and cordial to your critics. Try not to get bogged down by the people who are still trashing independent publishing like carriage company owners at the advent of the automobile, but also don’t be afraid to take a step into the traditional publishing world. And don’t Indie Publish if you aren’t going to enjoy at least a little bit of the ride. ;)

Finally, since this business is all about word of mouth, do you have any Indie Writers you enjoy?

All of the writers featured here over the last couple of weeks come highly recommended. Please, check each one of them out!
Tyrean Martinson
Loretta Boyett
Sarah Scheele
Warren Baldwin

And now for the giveaway!

Enter to win a $5 Amazon Card + a free copy of any of my books. By leaving a comment. (The Moment Max Forgot Me is always free, so don’t pick that one)Free MFM

And thank you again to all of the authors and readers who have joined me over the last month. I learned something from each author’s experience. Hopefully this month has helped writers considering this route of publishing, or opened someone up to the idea of reading independent authors.

So, are eBooks taking over the world?

I’m sorry Barns and Noble.  We had a good thing going there for a while, but I just feel like we’ve grown apart over the years.

Yep, I am proud owner of a Kindle these days.  Yes, yes, I know, I said I’d never be an eBook reader.  I also said I’d never blog, Facebook, or wear skinny jeans…anyway…

Every time I turn around someone else I know also has a Kindle (or some other eReader).  But the battle lines are being drawn.  My traditional bibliophile friends are raising their defense and digging in their heels with talk of the “feel” of a real book.  This might mean war…but who will win?

Well, I’ll start by telling you why I, owner of so many real books I have to stack them vertically on my shelves, made the switch.
Price.  On the whole, eBooks are cheaper, all books pre-1923 are totally free, and a lot of major books come up for free or discounted on a regular basis.
Time.  I don’t have to drive to the bookstore in hopes of finding the book I’m looking for or order it online and wait a week for it to show up.  All I need is 60 seconds to download.
Space.  Back to stacking books vertically.  I have an 11×12 room with about 200 books crammed into it.  The idea of 3,000 books on one slim-line device that fits in my purse gets to be very appealing.

Now to the question of whether eBooks are taking over the world.  Do I think we’ll see a complete end to paper books?  No.  Do I think eBooks will become the primary way of reading? Yes.
Case study: My family.
Bookstore shopper: My grandmother.
Online book shopper: My mother.
eBook reader: The betrayer…Me….and I’m working on my mother.

Did I mention I can download samples of books before I buy them?  Love that!

Anyway, that’s my vote.  What’s yours?

P.S. To all of my traditional print friends, (drops voice to eerie tone) the eBooks are coming for you…

Oh, no! The eBooks are coming for me!

I’m considering renaming this blog “Things I thought I’d never do” since that particular topic comes up so often. ;) So what did I do this time that I was once sure I wasn’t ever really going to get into? One word. Ebook. :P

We’ve talked about eBooks here before. My book is available as an eBook and on Kindle, so I’ve looked into the concept…but I’m a book person! I love the look of full bookshelves as much as I do reading itself. ;)
That’s not to say that the idea of the eBook hasn’t slowly been edging into my brain. I’ve read a bit in an eBook form. A serial here and there. But never a full book experience. It seemed so wrong, part of the reason being I do not like excessive scrolling on a computer screen. I think I have scroll-sickness (It’s a recognized disorder, right?). And all the “eBook readers” have screens so small my eyes strain at the very thought of trying to use one, not to mention the heart attack my wallet would have if I thought of buying one.
Well, then along comes a co-worker of mine, extolling wonders of eBooks. She showed me the free eBook reader software anyone can download from Barns and Nobles’ website. It’s set up to read left to right so that when you are looking at the computer screen you are in essence looking at an open faced book.
Sure, it looked a lot more comfortable to read and how can you beat free, right? But still, we’re talking eBooks and I like real books….
…I was firm in my belief until last Saturday. Then I suddenly found myself wanting to read a particularly book, but:
1.) I did not have time to go to the bookstore.
2.) I did not want to spend much money on the book because I wasn’t sure if it was any good.
3.) I really did not have time to go hunt for it at the library in hopes that I wouldn’t have to spend money on it.
So what was my solution? I downloaded it from B&N for $2 and started reading it immediately.

Now I’m wondering if this is how all those book people out there fall down the rabbit hole of eBooks. I use to think eBooks were something non-book people got into, but I can thoroughly see the appeal at the moment. :P Don’t worry too much. I still love owning books. A part of me kind of wants to go out and buy a copy of the book and just put it on my shelves. ;)
So, have you fallen into the eBook world yet or do you still insist that you are a through and through traditional print person?

Just for the record, my very first eBook was (drum-roll please) The Phantom of the Opera. Haven’t you ever watched a movie and wanted to know how the book compared? ;)

Look To The Right

Yes, scroll down just a bit and look to the right. Did you look? Good. Then you probably saw the poll I have there titled WHICH DO YOU PREFER? So, if you haven’t, VOTE. :)
Come now, I know I have visitors out there who haven’t voted yet. (Feel my reproachful gaze.)
And I’m certain you have an opinion. (Don’t deny it.)
This is actually a growing debate in the publishing word, especial in the wake of the popularity of the Kindle and iTunes.

For the record:
-I am a TRADITIONAL PRINT BOOK vote.
-Personally, I am not fond of audio books. One reason being I can read a book faster than I can listen to it. But I do know of people, particular those who have long commutes, who love them.
-I have not yet read an eBook, but I do intend to in the near future. A book I want to read has only been released in eBook. However, I can never see myself being won over by them entirely. Among other reasons, I love collecting books almost as much as reading them. I don’t think an eBook reader would make my house look as nice as a full bookcase would. ;)

So, what do you think?
(In reference to the person who voted WHAT’S A BOOK?…I know who that was and in a way he was being honest. :P)

Another Book Signing and Kindle Release!

Praise God, we’ve gotten another book signing scheduled! :D This one will be at the Borders in Fresno CA, Saturday May 16th at 1:00pm. I’ll send out notices and put up another reminder when we get closer to the date, but I just wanted put it up now because this is a good day! We were getting a little discouraged because several bookstores had turned us down, but God has His timing and His ways.

And, as promised, Only Angels Are Bulletproof has been release on Kindle! So, if you’re an eBook lover I hope you enjoy!